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The Songs of the River Running Region

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The Songs of the River Running Region

Postby Songweaver » Thu Feb 26, 2015 8:38 am

This forum's gone unused for too long. I put this challenge out to all of you:

Let's write, adapt, or otherwise collect songs (or just poems) in this thread that might be known in the region. I'll put together a wikipedia page of those that seem best to fit. Feel free to submit a few sentences on the origins and propagation of any songs that you submit. Also feel free to comment (positive feedback only!) on others' submissions, and we can collaborate to make these pieces as strong as possible.

One thing that SOI can always use more of is Tolkien-esque music. A large percentage of what Tolkien wrote was in poem or song format; it's part of the uniqueness and magic of Middle-Earth. Whether through bards, or just PCs being more music-oriented/aware, I'd love to encourage an injection of this concept into the gameworld.

I have a number of things that I've written, or adapted, that I'll submit throughout to get us started off. Time permitting, I may eventually work to add music to some of folks' submissions, and record them for audible reference. Or not, we'll see.
Last edited by Songweaver on Thu Feb 26, 2015 9:07 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: The Songs of the River Running Region

Postby Songweaver » Thu Feb 26, 2015 8:53 am

The Hallowing Charm

Fire I carry round the frith-stead,
and turn mens' hearts to stone.
Light I carry for enclosing,
and bid ill wights flee away.

Forest hallow,
Forest hallow,
Forest hallow this holy stead.

Fire I carry round the frith-stead,
and turn mens' minds to steel.
Light I carry for enclosing,
and bid shadows flee away.

River hallow,
River hallow,
River hallow this holy stead.

Fire hallow,
Fire hallow,
Fire hallow this holy stead.

Song Origins: Adapted for Shadows of Isildur by Songweaver, from a ritual derived from an ancient English manuscript.

Lore: A ritual song sung by Shamans or Chieftans, as they dance around a pyre. The purpose of the song, dance, and ritual is to invoke the spirits of Forest and River to cleanse a region within the wilderness deemed as cursed or haunted. In Beorning beliefs, the areas most likely to come under curse are where Forest meets River; and yet, if the land can be hallowed against evil spirits, Beornings also believe that the greatest bounties come from areas where Forest and River meet.




Untying Words

Though I be weak,
Let my spirit be free.
Though I be strong,
Let my spirit be free.

Though I be sick,
Let my spirit be free.
Though I be well,
Let my spirit be free.

Though I be poor,
Let my spirit be free.
Though I be rich,
Let my spirit be free.

Though I be sad,
Let my spirit be free.
Though I be happy,
Let my spirit be free.

Though I be bound,
Let my spirit be free.
Though I be free,
Let my spirit be free.

Whatever my trial,
Let me die unto me.
Whatever my trial,
Let my spirit be free.

Song Origin:
Lyrics by Paul Walker

Lore: A Beorning song, sung one verse at a time by a Chieftan or Shaman, and then echoed by Beorning warriors during the ritual application of Reidyr, either before battle or a spiritual journey.




Time and Tide

Through time and tide, through waters wide,
by blood and bone, by stock and stone,
by breath and breeze, by fire that frees.

Song Origin: Lyrics by Diana Paxson, pagan spiritualist

Lore: A resonating chant sung by Beornings as they light flames to invoke nature spirits, or to set ablaze a Great Effigy in remembrance of one of their honored dead. Typically, the chant is sung by the leader of the ritual, a Shaman or Chieftan, and begins anew sung in a round by any who feel moved to do so. The song ends when the fire burns at its brightest.




On the Day that I Die

On the day that I die,
cut short my finger nails,
that they may not slow the day
when I walk the Smoke Trails.

On the day that I die,
put shoes upon my feet,
that they safely carry me
to where I and Sky will meet.

On the day that I die,
tell tales of all my deeds;
for this is how I live on
in everyone who heeds.

On the day that I die,
pass a horn around,
make a toast and raise it high,
and lay me in the mound.

On the day that I die,
speak aloud my name;
seasons die and kinsmen die,
what never dies is fame.

Song Origin: Adapted for Shadows of Isildur by Songweaver, with permission from Michaela Macha

Lore: A favorite during Beorning Warrior funerals, customary to be sung by the man who has fought most often at the honored dead's side in battle, and before words of remembrance are spoken on behalf of the dead's greatest deeds.




Mound Maiden

In this silent mound I lie.
Do not mourn me, do not cry.

After labours I may rest.
A life lived well, this prize is best.

Let these treasures stay above;
Give me remembrance, and your love.

The Forest I'll no longer roam:
To the Sky I'm going home.

Song Origin: Adapted for Shadows of Isildur by Songweaver, with permission from Michaela Macha

Lore: A favorite during Beorning funerals, most often sung by the dead's husband or wife, or an immediate family member when there is no spouse. This song is most often sang once the honored dead's Great Effigy has burned, and the warriors have filled in the smoldering grave with dirt.




Good Evening, Good Night

Good evening, good night,
May your slumber be light,
May your dreams be deep
As Spirits watch your sleep.
In the morning you´ll rise
and be healthy and wise,
In the morning you´ll rise
and be healthy and wise.

Good evening, good night,
As the Moon shines bright,
Close your eyes now and rest,
May your slumber be blest.
In the morning´s fair skies
you will see Anor rise,
In the morning´s fair skies
you will see Anor rise.

Song Origin: Adapted for Shadows of Isildur by Songweaver, with permission from Michaela Macha

Lore: This is a simple, common Beorning lullaby sung by mothers and fathers to their young.
Last edited by Songweaver on Fri Feb 27, 2015 7:59 am, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: The Songs of the River Running Region

Postby radioactivejesus » Thu Feb 26, 2015 9:12 am

This thread is a great idea. The various songs, folk-tales, stories and whatnot feel like a big part of being among the free peoples of middle earth
also, since Utterby was founded as a lumber town...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mL7n5mEmXJo
A really bad sword with a short blade lies here.
look sword
This sword hardly even a sword. It's kind of really just a piece of metal bent like a sword. Its blade is rather short. Kind of pathetic, really.
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Re: The Songs of the River Running Region

Postby shezzarine » Thu Feb 26, 2015 9:21 am

I've got a few I wrote for old characters that could be relevant with some trimming and changing of context to make them fit this setting. I can post them up after work :D
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Re: The Songs of the River Running Region

Postby Songweaver » Thu Feb 26, 2015 7:54 pm

I've gone ahead and reposted above all of the stuff that I put together for Beornings last summer. This next one's somewhat more recent.


Wicked Winter's Spirits

Once,
Mountains sang an old song of woe:
two mates, hunting with hearts of snow.
He, was he not a Great, Strong Chief?
She, was she not the Silent Leaf?
They knew love as only two killers do.

Once,
They stalked and slew and knew no fear
with but their thirst for blood held dear.
"Wicked Winter's spirits!", Men claimed!
So in hushed whispers, they were named
and by dim tavern's light, their legend grew.

Then,
Anor rose, and Mountain cowered.
An Elf Lord, his steel devoured
Her mate's heart, and She watched him die.
"Darkness, give me vengeance!", She'd cry!
But the Dark said naught; She was left to rue.

Now,
Years have passed, but old wounds run deep.
She wanders the world, and will not sleep
until She has found what She seeks
in haunted woods, on frozen peaks:
a song of Life, and Death, and Revenge too.

Origin: Poem by Songweaver

Lore: A somewhat well-known, if not widely popular poem known by Bards along the River Running region and west as far as Bree. It's often repeated by parents to frighten their children away from venturing out into the wild. A running joke between Bards is that the poem refuses to be adapted to music, and that any minstrel attempting to undertake such a venture has formally announced the end of their career to the world at large, because they will inevitably fail.
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Re: The Songs of the River Running Region

Postby Grommit » Fri Feb 27, 2015 4:27 pm

There once was a hero named Ragnar the Red...
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Re: The Songs of the River Running Region

Postby Oblivion » Fri Feb 27, 2015 10:35 pm

Grommit wrote:There once was a hero named Ragnar the Red...


Whose mace, it was said, was large as his head...
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